Daily Life as Public Health Measures are Lifted

Daily Life as Public Health Measures are Lifted

Photo by Gustavo Fring

In Canada and the United States, certain public health measures are gradually being lifted as the spread of COVID-19 slows.1,2 Your local government may also be making decisions to lift or change public health measures depending on the level of COVID-19 transmission in your community. Please refer to recommendations and guidelines of the local public health authorities in your jurisdiction. 

Table of Contents:

  1. Helpful General Tips
  2. Using gyms/fitness centres
  3. Travelling overnight and hotels
  4. Going to parks and recreation areas
  5. Events and gatherings (e.g. birthday parties, weddings, cultural events)
  6. Beaches and pools
  7. References
1. Helpful General Tips1,2
  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • If available, use online services (e.g. paying online).
  • Maintain physical (social) distancing. You may wear a non-medical mask or face covering if you are unable to consistently maintain 2 metres or 6 feet from others.
  • Before going to a business or service, learn about the preventive measures they are using (e.g. the use of non-medical masks, curbside pick-up, plexiglass barriers).
  • Continue to practice personal preventative measures (e.g. good hand washing practices; cleaning and disinfecting surfaces; covering sneezes and coughs).
  • When going outside, helpful items to have on hand include: non-medical mask/face covering, tissues, and hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

Follow specific public health guidelines in your jurisdiction.

Other tips for gyms/fitness centres, travelling overnight and hotels, parks/recreation areas: 

2. Using gyms/fitness centres2
  • Before you go, identify preventive measures used at the location (e.g. plexiglass barriers) and use online check-in systems, if available
  • If possible, limit group activities that are conducted indoors. Outdoor activities and virtual sessions may be preferred. 
  • Maintain physical (social) distancing (i.e. maintain at least 2 metres or 6 feet from others and limit physical contact with others) 
  • Use other preventative measures (e.g. cover coughs and sneezes, good hand washing practices)
  • Make sure that equipment is cleaned and disinfected, and don’t share items that cannot be cleaned/disinfected
Photo by Karolina Grabowska
3. Travelling overnight and hotels2
  • Before you go, identify preventative measures used at the hotel (e.g. plexiglass barriers, staff must wear masks, cleaning/disinfecting items) and use online check-in systems, if available
  • Maintain physical (social) distancing (i.e. maintain at least 2 metres or 6 feet from others and limit physical contact with others) 
  • Use other preventative measures (e.g. cover coughs and sneezes, good hand washing practices, wear a non-medical mask or face covering)
  • Refer to local public health guidelines about travelling during the COVID-19 pandemic to plan your trip.
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio
4. Going to parks and recreation areas2
  • Before you go, check which services are open and available (e.g. washrooms)
  • Visit parks that are close to home and not crowded
  • Maintain physical (social) distancing (i.e. maintain at least 2 metres or 6 feet from others and limit physical contact with others) 
  • Use other preventative measures (e.g. cover coughs and sneezes, good hand washing practices)
Photo by Elly Fairytale

5. Events and gatherings (e.g. birthday parties, weddings, cultural events)1

The Public Health Agency of Canada has released guidance for events and gatherings on June 19, 2020. As an event organizer, you can help to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by identifying risks and taking measures to mitigate these risks. 

Here are some considerations:

  • Large or recurring events/gatherings may have greater risks and organizers should consult public health authorities for guidance
  • Consider if attendees can consistently maintain physical (social) distancing (i.e. at least 2 metres or 6 feet) with one another. Longer periods of time (i.e. more than 15 minutes) without physical (social) distancing may increase risks. Also, consider if event activities may increase the spread of respiratory droplets, such as activities related to singing, sharing foods/drinks, cheering.
  • Consider the risk of COVID-19 infection spread through surfaces that may be frequently touched (e.g. door handles, washrooms). 
  • Consider the event’s location and duration. Generally crowded, indoor spaces may have greater risks than outdoor spaces. Also, longer events could present greater risks. 
  • Consider risks to attendees who may be more vulnerable (e.g. older adults and those with compromised immune conditions).
  • Consider whether all attendees will follow preventative measures (e.g. good hand washing practices, covering coughs and sneezes)
Photo from Pexels.com

Here are some strategies to mitigate risks:

  • Encourage attendees who are feeling ill or individuals who are at high risk of disease to stay home
  • Devise a plan in advance for safely taking care of individuals who may become ill at your event/gathering (e.g. space to safely isolate)
  • Ensure that attendees follow proper preventive measures (e.g. washing hands, avoid touching face, maintaining physical distancing)
  • Increase ventilation or host an outdoor event/gathering, if possible
  • Modify the activities of the event/gathering (e.g. reducing duration of event, staggering attendees’ arrival, virtual options for individuals who cannot attend)
6. Beaches and Pools2
  • Currently, SARS-CoV-2 is not known to spread to people through water in swim areas (e.g. beaches, pools, water playgrounds).
  • Before you go, make sure to check for preventative measures used at the public swim area.
  • Maintain physical (social) distancing from others (i.e. at least 2 metres or 6 feet) when you are in and out of the water, and avoid crowded areas.
  • When physical (social) distancing is difficult to maintain, and you are not in the water, you may wear a non-medical mask or face covering.
  • Use other preventative measures (e.g. cover coughs and sneezes, good hand washing practices).
  • Avoid sharing items with individuals who do not live in your household
7. References
  1. Public Health Agency of Canada. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html  
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

This site was updated on Friday, July 10, 2020

Disclaimer: The information regarding COVID-19 is changing constantly as more data become available. The information provided in this website is not meant to replace diabetes healthcare team or public health agencies recommendations, and is intended for information purposes only. Please check with your healthcare providers for any deviations from your care plans.


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